International Luxemburgist Forum - Foro Luxemburguista Internacional - Forum Luxemburgiste Intl

Forum for those in general agreement with the ideas of Rosa Luxemburg.
Foro para aquellos que tienen un acuerdo general con las ideas de Rosa Luxemburgo.
Forum pour ceux qui ont un accord général avec les idées de Rosa Luxembourg.

Translations

Log in

I forgot my password

Navigation

Latest topics

Who is online?

In total there are 6 users online :: 0 Registered, 0 Hidden and 6 Guests :: 1 Bot

None


[ View the whole list ]


Most users ever online was 368 on Sun Feb 19, 2012 10:15 am

Statistics

Our users have posted a total of 4290 messages in 1330 subjects

We have 175 registered users

The newest registered user is toty5

    Strike in Greece, Huelga en Grecia, Grève en Grece

    Share

    ElIndio

    Number of posts: 341
    Group: Réseau Luxemburgiste International/International Luxemburgit Network
    Website: luxemburgism.lautre.net
    Registration date: 2008-04-16

    Re: Strike in Greece, Huelga en Grecia, Grève en Grece

    Post  ElIndio on Mon Mar 22, 2010 11:59 pm

    There can't be any doubt that the union bureaucracies and the party leaders will do all they can to stop workers from going "too far", that is beyond their control and their own objectives.

    The very same happens here in France (and surely in a lot of other places as well) and the situation is no where near of what you see in Greece. Last year, the establishment feared that the crisis would spark radical movements, they feared the foundation of the NPA (New Anti-Capitalist Party), they postponed a reform against public education afraid that the youth would follow the Greek example (this was actually the only battle "won" by the working class against Sarkozy)... What did the unions do? They called for "days of action" (demonstrations and strikes) every three or four weeks until workers got fed up of not getting paid for nothing and the government passed its laws.

    The same strategy is being applied tomorrow (well today since I am writing late) against further State/bosses attacks. Thank God, there have been isolated example where grass root workers went against the hierarchy of the union and fought radically, but always "just" for a better firing program.

    I am bringing the French case up because, as well as sharing local data, the strategy applied in Greece is applied elsewhere.

    As revolutionaries, we can't limit ourselves in the criticism against capitalism, we must oppose as well all bureaucracy (even when they pretend to be "red") and defend the idea of autonomy of workers.

    The Mass Strike is a booklet worth reading over and over again. I read it twice and would read it again with the light of recent events. The process described there a century ago is helpful for guiding our aims today.

    Indeed, the only real weapon left to workers is self-organization. The first step would be getting more workers aware of their power and willing to put their faith in them and not in politicians (anti-hierarchy). Then the "economic" demands in local strikes would lead to coordination on a larger scale, beyond a company, reaching national or international levels. Furthermore, such strike would draw more and more people urging workers to demand economic and political (that is power) demands.

    At each of these steps, we would face bureaucrats as well as cops, politicians, far right...

    It may seem distant but like the crisis has shown since 2008 history takes a fast lane from time to time. To me, this far, the best example are Guadeloupe, Greece and Spain.

    To be continued thus...

    RJHall

    Number of posts: 16
    Age: 47
    Location: Luxembourg
    Website: http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/204436-rjhall
    Registration date: 2010-02-10

    Re: Strike in Greece, Huelga en Grecia, Grève en Grece

    Post  RJHall on Thu Mar 25, 2010 8:29 am

    Thanks, and thanks for separately posting on the strike in France. There's a European Union summit today and tomorrow in Brussels in which the member states are split on the Greek crisis. We shall see what happens. In honor of the EU Summit, my signature below is a quotation from Rosa Luxemburg's "Peace Utopias" in 1911. A capitalistic European union is utopian.

    ElIndio

    Number of posts: 341
    Group: Réseau Luxemburgiste International/International Luxemburgit Network
    Website: luxemburgism.lautre.net
    Registration date: 2008-04-16

    Re: Strike in Greece, Huelga en Grecia, Grève en Grece

    Post  ElIndio on Fri Apr 02, 2010 7:53 am

    Hi and sorry for responding with lateness.

    I have hard time really understanding why the States are split over the Greek question. Of course, I don't buy the "solidarity" among capitalist states towards Greece (except in approving anti-workers measures in which their class interests binds them together like a rock) but I don't really understand why some want an exclusive European loan (France) and others prefer the IMF (Germany).

    One reply could be that if the EU is to help, the one really contributing is Germany... thus the insistance of the French State for that solution and the anti-Greek attacks in the German bourgeois press...

    I think there is more than meets the eye in this episode. Does the EU fear loosing power in relation to the US by requesting the help of the IMF ? Is this the beginning of the end of the EU (I doubt it since the EU has been set up in order to better compete against the US, Japan and now China).

    Your quote of Rosa is interesting, I didn't know it. I do believe that in her times it was a pure utopia but in this more globalised world, wouldn't the EU be a temporary possibility allowing European capitalists to better compete against American counterparts?

    RJHall

    Number of posts: 16
    Age: 47
    Location: Luxembourg
    Website: http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/204436-rjhall
    Registration date: 2010-02-10

    Re: Strike in Greece, Huelga en Grecia, Grève en Grece

    Post  RJHall on Mon Apr 12, 2010 9:50 am



    Yes, the Easter holidays make us all late in responding - now it's my turn!

    I think that the capitalists in Germany and France have diametrically opposing interests. France is a debtor importer nation, and what it needs under capitalism is to be the hub country in a network of other countries it controls that can export and lend to it, while Germany is a creditor exporter nation and what it needs under capitalism is to be the hub country in a network of other countries it controls that can buy its exports and accept its investments. In the 18th or 19th centuries capitalism was primitive enough so that both interests could be met by separate systems side by side. But by 1911, as Rosa pointed out then, world capitalism had already globalized enough so that separate systems were impossible and global capitalism could not completely satisfy both sets of needs and schemes like a United States of Europe could not paper over the differences in material interests. A century later, globalization has advanced even farther and so a European Union is even more incapable of reconciling these interests under capitalism. The fundamental contradiction between the globalized world economy and the nation-state system is seriously growing acute in recent months and years.

    Although Rosa did not see it (or at least did not say it) before August 4, 1914, the Second International was similarly utopian before World War I. For years the International had been issuing declarations about internationalism and peace and opposing nationalism and war, but when push came to shove, on August 4 the largest sections of the Second International, the largest Social Democratic parties in Europe, renounced internationalism and even the class struggle and came out squarely in support of "their" countries' governments in the war. Actions speak louder than words, and the Second International was revealed to have been only words, not actions. I think the present European Union is the same. All the declarations of unity and cosmopolitanism and one-Europe-ism will count for nothing when material national power interests assert the demand for actions rather than words. A few months ago when they were selecting the leader of the European Union, all the big-name Europeans with power like Sarkozy and Merkel were unanimously uninterested in applying for the post. Except for Tony Blair, all the candidates were people nobody in big countries has heard of (including Luxembourg's Prime Minister Jean-Claude Juncker, who might have gotten the post if Sarkozy hadn't vetoed him at the last minute!). When it went to Van Rompuy, that led to the joke in the U.S., "China has President Hu, and now Europe has President 'Who?'" National leaders (not just of Europe) have been routinely going to summit meetings the past couple of years proclaiming the need for international unity and against economic protectionism, and then they go home and promptly enact protectionst measures and "beggar-thy-neighbor" policies.

    I think within the next few years an event or date like August 4, 1914, will suddenly reveal the EU to have been all talk and no action, though of course I cannot predict what or when that event will take place, any more than anyone could predict the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand would spark off World War I even though people had foreseen for years and decades that the war was coming. The Eurozone (incidentally, Juncker is still head of the Eurogroup) and the Euro money will at least change or even collapse in the next few years, and the EU, even if it continues to exist in name only, will be like the Second International (which even today still exists, in name only), utterly discredited. In fact, I wouldn't be all that surprised if a World War I-type event hit Europe (or even the rest of the world) sometime this decade.

    On the EU and the Greek question, there has been some news since our last posts. The EU summit in March, which had avoided a bailout except as a "last resort", has been substantially reversed by a new hastily organized (led by Sarkozy and Burlosconi) emergency bailout plan for Greece by European states of 30 billion euro at interest rates lower than Greece now has to pay on the international market but still higher than Germany has to pay. This shows that the real power after all is not with the European politicians, but with the international banks and hedge funds, which have increased their pressure on European countries and the Euro currency. Even Angela Merkel has now reluctantly agreed to appease these financial masters, this upper class. Meanwhile, with Greek workers back in the office instead of in the streets, there is nobody to stop the pressure on them to drastically reduce their standard of living. And this is, of course, just the test case for the class struggle against all workers in Europe. (After all, even Germany and France have huge state debts, so harsh austerity programs must come for those workers too!) What we urgently need is not a capitalistic European Union, but a United Socialist States of Europe!

    luxemburguista
    Admin

    Number of posts: 1102
    Group: Les Alternatifs - Los Alternativos
    Website: http://www.alternatifs.org/spip/
    Registration date: 2008-04-16

    Re: Strike in Greece, Huelga en Grecia, Grève en Grece

    Post  luxemburguista on Mon Apr 19, 2010 6:16 pm

    Eurolandia se convierte en coto de caza

    It´s a very interesting text from Michael R. Krätke. I suppose that you can read it in english, but I don´t know where.

    Creo que un aspecto a destacar, inserto en los modos de actuación de la UE, es la "combinación" con el FMI: será éste quien ponga las "reglas" o condiciones a Grecia, por lo que siempre podrá ser responsabilizado de lo que ocurra (a nivel social, de los "costes" sociales). Eso cuando el FMI pondrá menos dinero que la UE, por lo que parecería lógico que fuera ésta quien dictase las condiciones del préstamo. Pero no será así. También sería lógico que ni siquiera hiciese falta el FMI, que la UE resolviera el problema por sí misma. Pero creo que también pretenden "reactivar" ese odioso, desprestigiado y repugnante organismo internacional.

    Por último, la forma de "resolver" el problema es un claro aviso para navegantes: marca el camino para futuras actuaciones.
    SALUD
    SALUD


    _________________
    ¡SOCIALISMO O BARBARIE!
    Los Alternativos
    Les Alternatifs

    martin

    Number of posts: 100
    Registration date: 2009-05-25

    sobre Grecia

    Post  martin on Mon Apr 19, 2010 8:52 pm

    Más o menos estoy siguiendo el debate sobre Grecia aquí y en los medios de comunicación oficiales (burgueses) y extraoficiales (alternativos), y pregunto: ¿la lógica de la intervención internacional parte del supuesto de que todo lo que gasta un estado debe haber sido ingresado previamente, que hay que contener el gasto público, y lógicamente, la deuda no puede superar el 3%? ¿Y, además, que fuera de todos esos márgenes, a Grecia lo único que le espera es salirse del Sistema Monetario Europeo, es decir, hoy por hoy, la nada acompañada de la depreciación de la moneda y la inflación?
    Sobre lo que el movimiento obrero griego puede hacer, ¿sabéis si existen redes de apoyo internacional más allá de declaraciones de intenciones y análisis?
    Un saludo.

    luxemburguista
    Admin

    Number of posts: 1102
    Group: Les Alternatifs - Los Alternativos
    Website: http://www.alternatifs.org/spip/
    Registration date: 2008-04-16

    Re: Strike in Greece, Huelga en Grecia, Grève en Grece

    Post  luxemburguista on Mon Apr 19, 2010 11:58 pm

    La deuda y/o el déficit son en realidad excusas, puesto que:

    La riqueza existe, Grecia no es un país subdesarrollado. Otra cosa es cómo esté repartida. La cuestión pasa a priori por de dónde provienen los ingresos estatales, por los impuestos. Y en todas partes se están primando los indirectos (sobre el consumo y pagados por igual por todos, independientemente de la renta). La cuestión es si puede ser de otra manera, sin provocar una profundización de la crisis, en el contexto del capitalismo actual. En mi opinión, no, puesto que lo quitado a las rentas más altas mermaría su capacidad de inversión, afectando a la propia acumulación. Y esas rentas más altas también son "prisioneras" del capital ficticio y la especulación. Por tanto, sólo en o "hacia" otro contexto sería viable, al no importar que la crisis del propio sistema se extendiera por estar decididos a cambiarlo.

    Los estados tienen dinero para dar a quienes consideran (a bancos, transnacionales,...). Ya han dado todo lo que han podido (y más). Eso es lo que explica los aumentos del déficit y la deuda, y no las pretendidas medidas "sociales", formas de maquillar y evitar el colapso simultáneo de la mayoría. Por tanto, el déficit y la deuda son consecuencia de unas políticas decididas, y no casualidad.

    Esas inyecciones de liquidez tienen efectos limitados en el tiempo. Es decir, ya están acabando su capacidad de mantener la acumulación. Por tanto, serán necesarias nuevas inyecciones. Si es que se tienen.

    Evidentemente, para evitar la bancarrota y para conseguir nuevos fondos para subvencionar a los ricos, de algún sitio hay que recortar. Y ese sitio son las rentas (en sus distintas formas) que perciben los trabajadores y ciudadanos en general.

    Aunque los sectores económicos "tradicionales" estén ya en su inmensa mayoría privatizados (en Grecia, en España y en Pernambuco) la dinámica actual del capitalismo le lleva a fijar su atención preferente en los servicios, y en especial en los esenciales. Eso es lo que marca la OMC, la directiva Bolkestein,... Y que ya hemos comentado en este mismo Foro y en textos. Para eso nada mejor que una especie de "estado de emergencia económica" que justifique la opción privatizadora. Quienes pensaron en el final del "neoliberalismo" no han entendido la lógica subyacente de la evolución capitalista (más allá de los altibajos o tácticas de momentos concretos). Ni siquiera han contrastado las teorías keynesianas con la realidad de sus aplicaciones prácticas. Ahora, las instituciones neoliberales por antonomasia, comenzando por el FMI, regresan cual aves fénix. Porque nunca se fueron. Ni se van a ir porque se promueva una regulación inviable del capitalismo.

    Por todas las vías, se trata de un trasvase de riqueza a manos privadas. Un trasvase a escala mundial, pues son las transnacionales las principales beneficiarias (y aquellas empresas que les "auxilien" en el proceso serán pasto de la tendencia al monopolio más tarde o temprano).

    Todo está pensado para mantener la tasa de acumulación. Pero como esa tasa debe ir en aumento (para evitar la crisis), las consecuencias del proceso, en las condiciones actuales, no harán sino acelerar el propio proceso de crisis.

    El llamado capital ficticio o especulativo existe y es bien real. Pero en última instancia está ligado al capital productivo y éste, en última instancia, a las posibilidades de reproducción ampliada del capital y sus formadores, incluyendo a la mano de obra. Por tanto, la dinámica de preeminencia del trabajo muerto sobre el trabajo vivo es a la postre "suicida" y supondrá, antes o después, la ruina del propio sistema. Ese "suicidio" es a lo que estamos asistiendo.

    En cualquier caso, la extensión de la deuda o del déficit no pueden ser soluciones a medio o largo plazo. Porque son mecanismos intrasistema, por lo que dependen de la propia lógica de desarrollo del sistema. Serían "pan para hoy y hambre para mañana". Y en el corto plazo son inviables sin la anuencia de los propios mercados de deuda y demás mecanismos del sistema (incluyendo las "instituciones de calificación"). Esos "mecanismos" han dictado ya sentencia sobre la situación presente, por lo que pensar en una extensión sin más (controlada y con fines "sociales") de la deuda es vano. Distinto es que el déficit aumente, pero por los mismos motivos que lo ha hecho hasta ahora.

    Que yo sepa, no existe ningún movimiento global que tenga las luchas de Grecia como referencia expresa de su propia lucha. Si bien los diversos grupos políticos con organizaciones afines en Grecia sí desarrollan campañas de difusión y propaganda, en especial los anarquistas, pero también grupos como En Lucha o la CCI.

    SALUD


    _________________
    ¡SOCIALISMO O BARBARIE!
    Los Alternativos
    Les Alternatifs

    luxemburguista
    Admin

    Number of posts: 1102
    Group: Les Alternatifs - Los Alternativos
    Website: http://www.alternatifs.org/spip/
    Registration date: 2008-04-16

    Re: Strike in Greece, Huelga en Grecia, Grève en Grece

    Post  luxemburguista on Sun Apr 25, 2010 8:17 pm

    "Nosotros no pagamos, nos vamos a la huelga"
    Entrevista a Sotiris Kontogiannis, publicada por "En Lucha"
    SALUD


    _________________
    ¡SOCIALISMO O BARBARIE!
    Los Alternativos
    Les Alternatifs

    ElIndio

    Number of posts: 341
    Group: Réseau Luxemburgiste International/International Luxemburgit Network
    Website: luxemburgism.lautre.net
    Registration date: 2008-04-16

    Re: Strike in Greece, Huelga en Grecia, Grève en Grece

    Post  ElIndio on Sun May 02, 2010 9:25 pm

    On the EU and the Greek question, there has been some news since our last posts. The EU summit in March, which had avoided a bailout except as a "last resort", has been substantially reversed by a new hastily organized (led by Sarkozy and Burlosconi) emergency bailout plan for Greece by European states of 30 billion euro at interest rates lower than Greece now has to pay on the international market but still higher than Germany has to pay. This shows that the real power after all is not with the European politicians, but with the international banks and hedge funds, which have increased their pressure on European countries and the Euro currency. Even Angela Merkel has now reluctantly agreed to appease these financial masters, this upper class. Meanwhile, with Greek workers back in the office instead of in the streets, there is nobody to stop the pressure on them to drastically reduce their standard of living. And this is, of course, just the test case for the class struggle against all workers in Europe. (After all, even Germany and France have huge state debts, so harsh austerity programs must come for those workers too!) What we urgently need is not a capitalistic European Union, but a United Socialist States of Europe!

    Indeed, they finally agreed to "help" out the Greek State. These are the details I got this far :

    - Loan of 110 billions Euros (80 from the EU and 30 from the IMF)

    - The Greek public deficit must go from today's (or 2009's) 14 % to 3 %

    - Interest rate of 5 %

    The situation is so urgent that the EU is holding a meeting on May 7th even if Junckers already said that they would not renounced to their decision (so who gives a damn of what the European parliaments say over this) and the firts loans will be issued before May 19th !

    While thinking about the Greek situation, I could not stop comparing it with how the authorities dealt with the subprimes crisis. At first, they did nothing thinking it was not such a big problem. Then they tooked the decision to intervene quickly as the financial markets went down.

    The big difference so far is the Central European Bank did not create more cash by lending to Greece at lower rate than what is proposed by the EU and the IMF. Why? Because I think that is going to be their last resort, create Euros ex nihilo, out of the blue in order to pay back the debts. Unless workers don't fight back.

    There is a general strike on May 5th.


    Martin,

    ¿la lógica de la intervención internacional parte del supuesto de que todo lo que gasta un estado debe haber sido ingresado previamente, que hay que contener el gasto público, y lógicamente, la deuda no puede superar el 3%?

    Creo que la logica va mas allà. Se trata de privatisar todo y dejar nada al estado (y desde luego al sector pùblico) para poder continuar acumulando. De paso, el limite de 3% son para el deficit publico.

    Grecia lo único que le espera es salirse del Sistema Monetario Europeo, es decir, hoy por hoy, la nada acompañada de la depreciación de la moneda y la inflación?

    Una propuesta hecha por algunos economistas fue de sacar a Grecia del sistema monetario europeo. Despues, le pais volveria a su moneda y la devaluaria.

    El problema es que las deudas griegas son en Euros. Al menos que se desvalue el Euro, la deuda no podrà reducirse.

    Sobre lo que el movimiento obrero griego puede hacer, ¿sabéis si existen redes de apoyo internacional más allá de declaraciones de intenciones y análisis?

    Desgraciadamente, no se mucho mas de lo que ya puso Paco. Se que hubo una declaracion de partidos anticapitalistas europeo sobre el tema pero ne sé si hay otra cosa mas.

    De acuerdo con lo dicho por Paco. No hay otra salida (para la burguesia) que ir en contra de los trabajadores. Por eso la respuesta en Grecia tendrà todo un valor y significado para el futuro. Igual en España...

    ElIndio

    Number of posts: 341
    Group: Réseau Luxemburgiste International/International Luxemburgit Network
    Website: luxemburgism.lautre.net
    Registration date: 2008-04-16

    Re: Strike in Greece, Huelga en Grecia, Grève en Grece

    Post  ElIndio on Sun May 02, 2010 9:41 pm

    Grèce : non aux plans de l’UE et du FMI !

    Les coups terribles portés contre les conditions de vie du peuple grec sont mis en scène, afin de les faire accepter comme une fatalité.

    Les institutions grecques et l’Union européenne (UE) font tout pour exclure la possibilité d’une protestation radicale face à leurs attaques contre la population. De leur côté, les journaux étrangers n’en finissent pas de radoter sur « les Grecs » qui « truquent les chiffres » et « vivent au-dessus de leurs moyens », ou sur la « tragédie grecque » à l’œuvre, avec l’impossibilité d’échapper aux spéculateurs. Quant au Premier ministre Georges Papandréou (Pasok), il a choisi le joli port d’une petite île pour demander l’activation du programme de prêts de l’UE (30 milliards d’euros), et du FMI (entre 10 et 15 milliards), en s’appuyant sur des références littéraires comme l’Odyssée. De telles mises en scène semblent fonctionner : le gouvernement socialiste, malgré la trahison totale de ses promesses électorales, devance la droite de 8, 5 % dans les sondages. Mais elles offrent aussi des contradictions qu’on ne se privera pas de mettre en avant : qui sont les terribles Cyclopes que combat Ulysse, les magiciennes qui transforment les marins en pourceaux (en « PIGS » : Portugal, Irlande, Grèce, Espagne !), sinon les représentants des gouvernements et des patrons qui, en s’attaquant au petit Ulysse grec, veulent surtout engager une totale remise en cause de tous les acquis du mouvement ouvrier en Europe ? Inutile donc de s’appesantir sur les dangers du célèbre chant des sirènes : « Ouvrez les yeux, fermez la télé ! » est dans la période plus vrai que jamais, en Grèce comme ailleurs. N’a-t-on pas ainsi entendu le présentateur des infos sur France 2 indiquer que la manifestation du vendredi 23 avril, appelée par les syndicats de base et la gauche antilibérale et anticapitaliste pour protester contre les diktats de l’UE et du FMI, était une initiative de « l’ultra-gauche », sous-entendu violente et minoritaire ? En revanche, ce qui n’est pas souligné aux infos, mais qui est ressenti sur le terrain par la population, c’est la bonne idée des émissaires du FMI de fouler le sol grec à la date anniversaire du début du régime de la junte militaire soutenue par les USA (du 21 avril 1967 à l’été 1974). Un tel symbole parle beaucoup plus que toutes les mises en scène évoquées et ne peut que renforcer la colère populaire face aux nouvelles menaces. Les mesures accablantes déjà prises en février et mars ne suffisent pas à l’UE et au très socialiste président du FMI Dominique Strauss-Kahn, qui explique qu’il faut étendre au privé les coupes appliquées au secteur public et qu’il faut aller plus loin (salaires, droit du travail) avec une cure de déflation pour que la Grèce devienne concurrentielle !
    Tout est donc fait pour que les travailleurs se résignent devant l’ampleur de la riposte à construire, et la riposte syndicale (les syndicats sont dirigés par le courant Pasok) n’est pas à la hauteur, malgré la pression exercée par les syndicats de base. La crainte des bureaucrates est alignée sur celle des bourgeois : la colère ouvrière, telle qu’on l’a vue le 22 avril (grève du secteur public) et le 23, pourrait devenir explosive. Après un 1er Mai qui pourrait être très très combatif mais s’annonce divisé, et avec la perspective d’une grève générale le 5 mai, comment élargir et unifier les mobilisations, très nombreuses chaque jour mais partielles (actuellement : grève des marins, des transports en commun…) ? Un début de réponse est la constitution, encore trop faible, de comités unitaires contre les mesures scélérates.

    Andreas Sartzekis

      Current date/time is Thu Apr 17, 2014 6:29 pm